NEWS: Cutting-edge entertainment as Matthew Bourne’s ‘Edward Scissorhands’ visits Milton Keynes Theatre, February 2015

 

Choreographer Matthew Bourne is renowned for his cutting-edge productions and sharp wit so his adaptation of Edward Scissorhands is sure to pierce hearts when it visits Milton Keynes Theatre from Tuesday.

Edward Scissorhands, the touching tale of the boy with a full set of paper-cutters on the end of each arm, was first premiered by Bourne’s company, New Adventures, in 2005. Since then, the production has carved a place in the hearts of thousands across the world, enjoying sell-out performances in Europe, America, Asia and Australia.

This spectacular modern fairy tale has now returned to the UK in its first major revival and, after seasonal success at Sadler’s Wells over Christmas, the show is stopping off in the new city to give theatregoers here a slice of the cleverly-choreographed action. Blending contemporary dance with drama, Bourne’s work has widespread appeal and Lez Brotherston’s stunning sets always add to the theatrical magic.

 

Edward Scissorhands. Matthew Bourne's Edward Scissorhands.

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INTERVIEW with Tim Hodges, New Adventures, January 2015

 

Dancer Tim Hodges has featured in pop videos, performed in the West End and toured the UK and beyond in hit musicals.

Currently cast in Matthew Bourne’s production of Edward Scissorhands, Tim found time between rehearsals to talk to Georgina Butler about how this witty, modern fairytale carves a place in audiences’ hearts.

 

Inspired to pursue dance professionally after seeing videos of Mikhail Baryshnikov, Tim Hodges began dancing as a youngster in Milton Keynes at the Woollard Tiffin School of Performing Arts before winning a place at Tring Park.

Now, aged 29 and starting to inspire the next generation of dancers through his own teaching, Tim Hodges is thrilled to be touring the United Kingdom as part of Matthew Bourne’s company, New Adventures, in Edward Scissorhands.

I spoke to Tim before he attended today’s class and afternoon rehearsals to learn more about his life as a dancer and quiz him on what makes this Bourne show “a cut above” the rest.

 

Tim Hodges. Headshot.

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REVIEW: Matthew Bourne’s ‘Swan Lake’ – Milton Keynes Theatre, January 2014

 

A flock of muscular, lyrical, completely masculine creatures took to the stage at Milton Keynes Theatre last night in Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake, a contemporary re-imagining of an iconic ballet.

Bourne’s Swan Lake is an original take on an age-old favourite. His cheeky re-write ruffled a few feathers among balletomanes when first performed in 1995 but has since collected over thirty international theatre awards and is now regarded as a modern classic.

Traditionally, the ballet is associated with tutu-clad female corps de ballet dancers gliding gracefully en pointe in carefully coordinated formations. Bourne replaces these bourréeing beauties with an ensemble of powerful, bare-chested, male dancers decked out in baggy, feathered, knee-length trousers and shuns the standard prince/princess pas de deux for a duet between two male performers.

 

The Company in Matthew Bourne's 'Swan Lake'

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NEWS: So, that was Christmas – December 2013

 

Lots of dance on television makes for a cracker of a Christmas

 

Christmas makes its presence felt as soon as the BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing waltzes onto our television screens. When the sequin-covered participants take their first tentative steps onto the dance floor, I just know that the final quarter of the year will whizz by and, shortly, the winner will be lifting the coveted glitterball trophy, before the nation frantically finishes decking the halls.

Pantomime season means flocks of families visit the theatre for some festive cheer, while traditional productions of The Nutcracker (on stage and on screen) attract balletomanes and newcomers alike.

But, once cosseted in our homes for the celebratory period (whether just for the big day itself, or for an extended break), it is more often than not the television that we rely on for entertainment. Dance fans were spoilt for choice with plenty of telly treats this Christmas. If this time of year is all about indulging in what you enjoy, I certainly fulfilled the brief when it came to setting time aside to view some gorgeous productions.

 

Alina Somova in the quintessential Christmas ballet, The Nutcracker (photo by Valentin Baranovsky, sourced from http://www.specticast.com/event_generic.jsp?xml=/xml/event/Nutcracker.xml)

Alina Somova in The Mariinsky Ballet’s 2011 production of The Nutcracker (photo by Valentin Baranovsky, sourced from SpectiCast.com)

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REVIEW: Matthew Bourne’s ‘Sleeping Beauty’ – Milton Keynes Theatre, January 2013

 

Matthew Bourne’s Sleeping Beauty is at Milton Keynes Theatre this week and the innovative choreographer has added some bite to the ballet classic.

Matthew Bourne made his name with bold re-imaginings of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker (his was set in an orphanage and titled Nutcracker!) and Swan Lake (complete with a mesmerising ensemble of male swans). Seventeen years after the premiere of Swan Lake, Bourne’s company, New Adventures, is completing the Tchaikovsky trilogy with Matthew Bourne’s Sleeping Beauty, a gothic interpretation of the Charles Perrault fairytale.

Storytellers and choreographers have adapted the potent plot before. Versions of the story explore the themes of good versus evil, the beauty of youth and transformation, the power of evil curses and the all-pervading idea of love conquering all. Walt Disney’s 1959 film sharpened the original narrative to create more of an ongoing love story. Somewhat more controversially, in 1985, avant-garde Swedish choreographer Mats Ek cast Aurora as a junkie, with a syringe being the cause of a pricked finger.

In Matthew Bourne’s Sleeping Beauty, we still encounter the poisoned rose thorn that audiences expect – but the love story turns supernatural as vampires feature in the scenario.

 

Matthew Bourne's Sleeping Beauty.

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