INTERVIEW with Dame Gillian Lynne, October 2016

 

Acclaimed choreographer and theatre/television director Dame Gillian Lynne is a legendary figure in the arts, with a career spanning more than 70 years.
Her achievements include being a ballerina with Sadler’s Wells Ballet (now The Royal Ballet), performing centre stage as the London Palladium’s lead dancer and choreographing some of the world’s most iconic musicals.
Georgina Butler made the most of an opportunity to converse with this multi award-winning dance superstar…

 

Gillian Lynne is a household name – a VIP in the world of dance and theatre. Her CV is packed with soloist roles as a ballerina; guest appearances as a dancer on the stage and on television; and countless productions on which she has worked her magic as an internationally sought-after director and choreographer.

Joining the Ballet Guild in 1942, aged 16, marked the beginning of Gillian’s career as a professional dancer. By chance, Ninette de Valois, the founder of Sadler’s Wells Ballet (which later became The Royal Ballet), saw Gillian dancing as Odette in Ballet Guild’s production of Swan Lake and immediately decided she wanted the talented young artist in her company. When Gillian accepted this invitation, she was the first dancer to join Sadler’s Wells Ballet who had not studied at its prestigious feeder school (now The Royal Ballet School). Possessing a gift for dancing; a desire to follow her dreams; and a tenacious work ethic, Gillian flourished as a ballerina and was later an instant success at the London Palladium and in subsequent roles in the West End.

Perhaps most famous for her ground-breaking choreography in Cats and The Phantom of the Opera (both with Andrew Lloyd Webber), Gillian has choreographed or directed over 60 productions in the West End and on Broadway. These productions have won numerous accolades and Gillian has been presented with multiple awards, including two Olivier Awards – one an Award for Outstanding Achievement for her choreography of Cats in 1981, the other a Lifetime Achievement ‘Special’ Olivier presented to her in 2013.

 

Dame Gillian Lynne. Photograph by Greg Heisler, April 2009.

 

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REVIEW: ‘Jersey Boys’ – Milton Keynes Theatre, February 2015

 

There is something about men in suits who sashay in sequence while belting out a parade of pop hits. Perhaps it is their “silhouettes” or each individual’s ability to “walk like a man”, but the quartet starring in Jersey Boys at Milton Keynes Theatre seem too good to be true as they side-step, sway and strut behind their microphone stands.

Jersey Boys has been seen by over 19 million people worldwide and is the winner of 55 major awards. Firmly established as one of the West End’s longest running and most popular shows, the original London production opened in 2008. Seven years on and it continues to play in the capital, currently raising the roof of The Piccadilly Theatre. Understandably, theatregoers have been clamouring for tickets to see the touring production during its current run here in the new city.

The jukebox musical is the true story of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. The world loved their songs but, until this show, knew very little about the lives of the blue-collar lads who sang them. Divulging the secrets of a 40 year friendship, Jersey Boys recounts the experiences of four sons of Italian immigrants who grew up on the wrong side of the tracks in New Jersey.

 

Jersey Boys. Lewis Griffiths, Tim Driesen, Sam Ferriday and Stephen Webb in Jersey Boys UK tour. Photo by Helen Maybanks.

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REVIEW: ‘Cats’ – Milton Keynes Theatre, June 2013

 

CATS IS A SMASH-HIT MUSICAL OF PURE PURRFECTION

 

Miaow! The claws were out when it was announced that record-breaking musical Cats would be stopping off at Milton Keynes Theatre on tour, with fans clamouring to book for the show. Fortunately, I got my paws on a ticket and – once seated in the auditorium – felt like the proverbial cat that got the cream.

This show combines words, music, dance, costumes and design for an evening of pure purrfection. Composed by musical theatre impresario Andrew Lloyd Webber, Cats is based on ‘Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats’, a collection of light verse by T.S. Eliot (published in 1939). The show first opened in the West End in 1981 and enjoyed a phenomenal twenty-one year run (with a similarly impressive eighteen years on Broadway), smashing records and winning awards.

This remarkable musical tells the story of a tribe of felines, known as the ‘Jellicles’. We join them on the night of ‘the Jellicle choice’ – deciding which cat will rise to the Heaviside Layer to be reborn. The set throughout is a junkyard – a playground for the tribe. Instantly recognisable items spill over the side of the stage, including tin cans (Heinz Macaroni, Princes Peaches, Princes Prunes, Go Cat) and egg boxes.

 

 

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REVIEW: ‘Hairspray’ – Milton Keynes Theatre, April 2013

 

BIG HAIR, BIG HEART – Swinging ’60s show Hairspray has it all.

 

“If you can spray it and lock it, you can take off in a rocket” trills an enigmatic TV host in the latest musical to take to the stage at Milton Keynes Theatre. Hairspray certainly delivers a powerful performance.

Amidst a stage bathed in a pink glow, we are welcomed to the ’60s (June 1962 to be precise) in Baltimore, Maryland. Here, we follow the bold journey taken by a larger-than-life high school student whose sheer passion for dance sees her going all out to fulfil her dream to star on local teenage dance television programme, The Corny Collins Show (based on the real-life TV hit, The Buddy Deane Show).

The curtain rises as “pleasantly plump” Tracy Turnblad (Italia Conti graduate Freya Sutton, making her professional theatre debut) muses about her fondness for her hometown, her love of dancing and her desire to be famous. Tracy is all about big – big hair, big personality and big heart – and she is radically open to new ideas and new styles.

At school, Tracey receives a warning about her inappropriate hair height and her openness to others sees her embrace everyone (from “the rats on the street” to “the flasher who lives next door” and “the bum on his bar room stool”).

She is the perfect heroine, then, for this musical as Hairspray is a social commentary of the injustices experienced by sections of American society in the 1960s. Through the toe-tapping song and dance numbers, the serious issues of racism, “size-ism” and difference are addressed.

 

Hairspray the musical. 'Good Morning Baltimore'.

 

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REVIEW: ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ – Milton Keynes Theatre, October 2012

 

The Phantom of the Opera is here in the new city this week, filling the auditorium of Milton Keynes Theatre with a chilling presence!

The West-End blockbuster is now into its 26th year and Cameron Mackintosh’s new production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s phenomenal musical was especially created for the 25th anniversary national tour.

As I had hoped, last night’s performance was spine-tingling. Indeed, from the moment the glittering chandelier was unveiled just above our heads, the audience knew that a spectacular evening of entertainment lay ahead.

 

The Phantom of the Opera.

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